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Journal Club Seminars

Contents

The Journal Club talks take place on Fridays from 12:00 - 1:00pm in SERF 383. Generally pizza and soda are served.

The Journal Club is crafted to be a very informal and friendly environment where graduate students can present talks on any subject of interest to them, be it a recent journal paper, their own research work, or any topic.

Everyone is welcome to attend.

If you are interested in giving a talk, please contact: Jung-Tsung Li

Past journal club talks are listed in the sidebar by year.

Upcoming Journal Club Seminars

WINTER 2018


January 25, 2019

 "Observations to Origins: Disentangling Gas Flows in the Circumgalactic Medium"

Zach Hafen (12:00-1:00)
Graduate Student
Northwestern University

 As much as half of the gas mass in our galaxy's dark matter halo may reside not in the galaxy itself, but in the surrounding area, the circumgalactic medium (CGM). The vast gas content of the CGM, loosely defined as the volume immediately outside the galaxy but inside the dark matter halo, can be broadly classified as originating either in accretion from the intergalactic medium (IGM) or winds from galaxies. Both of these are crucial to the process of galaxy formation: IGM accretion provides the material necessary for observed star formation rates, while galactic winds are linked closely to the regulation of star formation through feedback. Despite their individual importance, differentiating these gas flows in observations is an outstanding problem in studies of the CGM. I will discuss our efforts to address this problem through the use of hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations on two fronts: mock observations of CGM quasar absorption lines and "particle-tracking" analyses that reconstruct the full history of CGM gas.



February 1, 2019

 "Weighing the giants with CMB lensing"

Sanjay Patil (12:00-1:00)
Graduate Student
University of Melbourne

 Galaxy clusters are the largest virialized objects in the Universe, and are powerful probes of cosmology. Their abundance as a function of mass and redshift is extremely sensitive to how structures grow and the properties of dark energy. Though they are powerful probes of cosmology, they are currently limited by mass uncertainty which is ~ 15%. One way to measure cluster mass is through lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CMB-cluster lensing offers a robust and accurate way to constrain galaxy cluster masses, especially at high redshift (z > 1) where optical lensing measurements are challenging. With CMB lensing we expect to improve mass uncertainty to 3% for upcoming experiments such as AdVACT, SPT-3G etc., and to 1% for next-generation CMB experiments. In this talk, I will report on a demonstration of this technique using CMB data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to constrain masses of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) galaxy cluster catalog.



February 8, 2019

Cameron Trapp (12:00-12:30)
Physics Graduate Student
UCSD-CASS
OPEN TIME SLOT (12:30-1:00)



February 15, 2019

I-Da Chiang (12:00-12:30)
Physics Graduate Student
UCSD-CASS
OPEN TIME SLOT (12:30-1:00)



February 22, 2019

Gene Leung (12:00-12:30)
Physics Graduate Student
UCSD-CASS
OPEN TIME SLOT (12:30-1:00)



March 1, 2019

Dino Chih-Chun Hsu (12:00-12:30)
Physics Graduate Student
UCSD-CASS
Christian Aganze (12:30-1:00)
Physics Graduate Student
UCSD-CASS



March 8, 2019

OPEN TIME SLOT (12:00-12:30)
OPEN TIME SLOT (12:30-1:00)



March 15, 2019

Logan Howe (12:00-12:30)
Physics Graduate Student
UCSD-CASS
OPEN TIME SLOT (12:30-1:00)